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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right word. he won the election. he won it fair and square, to doubt about that, but i think there's been a tone of almost like an imperious tone the last few times. i'm not saying it will guarantee results if he's more outreach and republicans respond. i think he should try it. even independent voters have told me they thought the news conference last week was had too much arrogance and some of his tone. having said that, listen, he had some scars from the last four years. i guess he wants to get a little revenge. i think if he wants to make progress, he should try at least -- >> give him some advice. health care was the big first initiative or the stimulus program and health care, issues on which the republicans wanted no part of what the president wanted. and a lot of republicans say it poisoned the waters. when you look at the agenda now, there's the economy, the deficit, gun control, immigration. what should the president do first to show republicans he's not looking for revenge or looking to pick fights? >> i would say the bu
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
, over the top paranoia started with the election of a black president. >> how so? connect. >> let's remember that in 2008 obama had campaigned for his first election being afraid to mention the words gun and law in the same paragraph. he never said a single thing about gun control, gun safety laws. yet when he was elected, gun stores sold out of guns. gun stores sold out of ammunition because the gun lobby had persuaded them that this guy is coming for your guns. they're already paranoid, extremist -- >> let's get to that overlay. >> they don't like progressive, democratic administrations. a black president makes them crazy. >> this is what's changed congresswoman, in my focus. you have been totally focused for a generation since the tragedy in your family. this idea that we don't have a gun to protect ourselves, we don't have to go skeet shooting or shoot rabbits or deer in deer season, it's not the usual sort of healthy sounding at least reasons to have a gun. it's now i need my gun to protect me against the helicopters, the federal government, or the u.n. is coming to get me. a
now. this is the time to celebrate our democracy and celebrate the president's re-election. we'll be back at you some time soon but now is the time to take a little time off and be great that we're american. >> i know you will and i also know there are some issues in which we all ought to be able to work together. one of the things that i appreciate about you is that you've been able to do that, say that. it's important for the country. >> i think it's important for all of us to see this little goodwill, even if it's brief, especially around an historic moment like this right now. any final words you want to offer alex, governor, before you go? >> i had a huge mustache and didn't cut it until i was 26 because i wanted to look old and then i cut it off because i already was older looking and now alex will get a new lease on life. david, you look pretty good there, too. i think you're going to enjoy it. >> so that's the key to success, huh? >> you feel stronger, too, without that mustache? >> not just yet. i'm a little wobbly. it's cold up here now. >> governor, thanks very much
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)